I speak for the CDs part two

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I have always liked CDs. If anything my love for CDs is due to being in close proximity to them, as well as being a product of the late eighties in the heyday of the CD. In late 2007, I begged by Dad to get me a record player for my first ever apartment. At this time, I already had a sizable collection of CDs and surprising number of records considering I didn’t have  a record player of my own. I remember the special thrill of watching my music play from a record – something you actually don’t often get to see with CDs and certainly not with MP3s.

I tuned into the CBC Radio program Spark this afternoon to catch the tail end of a segment on making music with robots and coloured pencils. The art installation is called Looks Like Music, allowing individuals to accessibly make music without notation. While not entirely far off from computer programs, Looks Like Music founder, Yuri Suzuki, claims that there is a certain importance of tactility and music that is not attained by making music from a computer.

So, in the second installment of the I speak for the CDs series, I report here that CDs offer a unique experience where you can read, handle, and smell liner notes – a completely lost art in downloading music and their artwork. Here are some examples of notable album artwork in my collection:

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‘Album of the Year’ by the Good Life – A calendar from 2004.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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‘Take Care, Take Care, Take Care’ by Explosions in the Sky – a house with inside bits included.

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